1. floating-parade:

    More Inktobers sketches I did! The first being a bird lady, the second of another character I’ll be (eventually) adding to a story~

    Inktober update part 3, with character designs done with markers and ink :)

    Reblogged from: floating-parade
  2. floating-parade:

    A character who loves life, but brings death.

    The second image is the inkwork behind the first one~ Hopefully the proper story behind this will be developed and posted by next year. But for now, developmental work will be all that’s posted here. :)

    Inktober update 2 in my art blog, with a bit of story this time.

    Reblogged from: floating-parade
  3. floating-parade:

    Inktober sketches!
    The first one with a silly ghostly theme, the second one with a spicy chicken noodle theme (because I was hungry. Then I made soupy noodles for real. They didn’t escape, thankfully!)

    Updated my Art blog! Will be posting inktober art-dates from now on :D

    Reblogged from: floating-parade
  4. biomedicalephemera:

softlysexy:

biomedicalephemera:

The relation between the pelvis and the pelvic organs of the female
With so many sex ed textbooks and encyclopedias giving the standard “vertical cross section” view of the pelvis, or showing the organs without any context, it can be difficult to see in the mind exactly where everything lays.
In this diagram, "P" indicates the part of the sacrum that is both at its top, and farthest “forward” in the body. Below that point, it curves backwards. "S" is the pubic symphysis, which is the joint that brings together the two sides of the pelvis. It’s largely immobile, but very slightly stretchable with trauma or childbirth. "F" is the fundus of the uterus - a fundus is the part of a hollow organ that is farthest from its opening. "O" is the ovary, embraced (but not touched) by the fallopian tubes."R" is the rectum, the lowest section of the intestine, which travels behind the reproductive organs."B" is the bladder, which lays in front of the reproductive organs.
There are two primary parts to the pelvis: the pelvic spine, which includes the sacrum and coccyx; and the pelvic girdle, which is probably what you associate with “pelvis” - this is the two “pelvic bones”, the hip bones or coxal bones. 
As children, we have six hip bones - three on each side. The ilium (the big “wing” part, where the abdominal muscles attach), the pubis (that upper part of the “eyes” in the pelvis), and the ischium (the lower bit of the “eyes”, the “sit bone”). By age 25, all three sections have fused together, leaving us with just two hip bones.
An American Text-Book of Obstetrics for Practitioners and Students. Edited by Richard C. Norris, 1895.

random fact: the uterus and the fallopian tubes look nothing like this “rendition” at all, the fallopian tubes are long and thinner than angel hair pasta, and the uterus is also quite tiny.

True! However, the uterus in this rendition is WAY smaller than the vast majority of contemporary illustrations. It’s much closer to what a non-pregnant woman would look like than most illustrators put.
But yeah, the ovaries are surprisingly far-yet-not-far from the fallopian tubes, which are tiny little things with spindly little fingers at the end. In living women, standing up, the uterus is usually not even visible from the front, if they’re not pregnant. The size increase of the uterus from implantation to parturition is amazing and almost terrifying (okay, at least to me). However, the fallopian tubes remain basically the same throughout the entire life, unless they’re “tied” or removed.

    biomedicalephemera:

    softlysexy:

    biomedicalephemera:

    The relation between the pelvis and the pelvic organs of the female

    With so many sex ed textbooks and encyclopedias giving the standard “vertical cross section” view of the pelvis, or showing the organs without any context, it can be difficult to see in the mind exactly where everything lays.

    In this diagram, "P" indicates the part of the sacrum that is both at its top, and farthest “forward” in the body. Below that point, it curves backwards.
    "S" is the pubic symphysis, which is the joint that brings together the two sides of the pelvis. It’s largely immobile, but very slightly stretchable with trauma or childbirth.
    "F" is the fundus of the uterus - a fundus is the part of a hollow organ that is farthest from its opening.
    "O" is the ovary, embraced (but not touched) by the fallopian tubes.
    "R" is the rectum, the lowest section of the intestine, which travels behind the reproductive organs.
    "B" is the bladder, which lays in front of the reproductive organs.

    There are two primary parts to the pelvis: the pelvic spine, which includes the sacrum and coccyx; and the pelvic girdle, which is probably what you associate with “pelvis” - this is the two “pelvic bones”, the hip bones or coxal bones.

    As children, we have six hip bones - three on each side. The ilium (the big “wing” part, where the abdominal muscles attach), the pubis (that upper part of the “eyes” in the pelvis), and the ischium (the lower bit of the “eyes”, the “sit bone”). By age 25, all three sections have fused together, leaving us with just two hip bones.

    An American Text-Book of Obstetrics for Practitioners and Students. Edited by Richard C. Norris, 1895.

    random fact: the uterus and the fallopian tubes look nothing like this “rendition” at all, the fallopian tubes are long and thinner than angel hair pasta, and the uterus is also quite tiny.

    True! However, the uterus in this rendition is WAY smaller than the vast majority of contemporary illustrations. It’s much closer to what a non-pregnant woman would look like than most illustrators put.

    But yeah, the ovaries are surprisingly far-yet-not-far from the fallopian tubes, which are tiny little things with spindly little fingers at the end. In living women, standing up, the uterus is usually not even visible from the front, if they’re not pregnant. The size increase of the uterus from implantation to parturition is amazing and almost terrifying (okay, at least to me). However, the fallopian tubes remain basically the same throughout the entire life, unless they’re “tied” or removed.

    Reblogged from: scientificillustration
  5. cryokineticwolfies:

    pycr:

    Hi there! for the first month of our commissions we’re having a start up DISCOUNT!

    Head shots

      B&W - $10 USD (O/P $20 USD)

      Colour - $8 USD (O/P $15 USD)

    3/4 or Full body shots

      B&W - $15 USD (O/P $30 USD)

      Colour - $20 USD (O/P $35 USD)

    • Backgrounds are totally negotiable
    • Additional characters are are priced as separate characters ( no limit)
    • NSFW stuffs prices are to be negotiated via e-mail
    • All payments via PayPal in USD
    • Artworks are non-commercial use only

    Email us at justinlbg06@gmail.com with requests titled as “Commission Request”.

    How it would usually go down is, we will reply you, followed by full payment

    and we’ll start the commission.

    All works are Digital only, if there are any special request for traditional Black & White pieces, e-mail us with the title “Traditional Request” and we will negotiate :)

    Visit our main artist’s website at  http://aizenaku.tumblr.com/ 

    Hey guys i’m starting commissions, I’d really appreciate it if everyone could help me reblog this to get the word around! 

    Reblogged from: cryokineticwolfies
  6. cliobablio:

    Week 2 of Inktober (or at least a cohesive chunk of it at a time).

    Reblogged from: cliobablio
  7. littledeerling:

I started this as a sketch for a 3 way art meme but then I ended up colouring it too… MY BAD

    littledeerling:

    I started this as a sketch for a 3 way art meme but then I ended up colouring it too… MY BAD

    Reblogged from: cryokineticwolfies
  8. Reblogged from: cryokineticwolfies
  9. catfromwonder:

    Craig Elliott

    Reblogged from: cryokineticwolfies
  10. Reblogged from: staticwaffles
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